All Posts by NEII, Inc.

Seismic Design Considerations for Elevators Installed in the U.S. under IBC

​More than 40 U.S. states have replaced their legacy building code with the International Building Code (IBC). In this paper, we will explore the impact of this transition as it relates to the elevator seismic requirements under the ASME A17.1/CSA B44 Elevator Code (See Section 8.4).
 
Prior to the 2013 code, elevator component seismic force levels were determined by either seismic zone or ground motion. However, for jurisdictions under IBC, this long standing approach of needing only one value to determine elevator component seismic force level is no longer valid.

​Transition of Seismic Design criteria in Model Codes

​The intent of the seismic design criteria in model codes is to minimize property damage and maintain function during and after an earthquake. This seismic design criterion has evolved to the point where, under the IBC as incorporated in the 2013 version of the elevator code, the traditional “Seismic Zone” approach used in elevator design and installation is no longer applicable. The criterion used in the IBC is called “Seismic Design Category.” For the United States’ building industry,
this transition has been going on for a number of years. Table 1 (page 3) shows the building code’s evolution during this transition from Seismic Zones to Seismic Design Category.
 
The elevator code retains the seismic zone approach by allowing equivalence to or comparison with a seismic zone, given a ground motion parameter, during this transition period. This equivalence is based on the Affected Peak Velocity Acceleration Parameter (AV). However, the transition period is over, a fact which is readily apparent with the publication of the 2013 elevator code. So what does this mean for those jurisdictions who adopted the IBC Seismic Design Category? See Table 2 (page 3) for the comparison between Affected Peak Velocity Acceleration and Seismic Zone. This comparison has been in the A17.1 elevator code since 2000 and continues to be in the 2013 elevator code.
 
Where the new code has been adopted, the elevator manufacturer/installer must obtain a number of seismic parameters in order to determine the applicable force levels to be applied to the installed elevator equipment.

​Seismic Design parameters in the IBC

​Under the IBC, which references ASCE 7, there are a number of seismic parameters that the elevator manufacturer/installer must know in order to bid, design, specify, layout, and install the elevator equipment in a building designed under IBC. These parameters are needed before the elevator manufacturer/installer can determine if Section 8.4 of the elevator code will or will not apply to the installation. These parameters are also specified in ASCE 7, American Society of Civil Engineers – Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures. You can see the design parameters in detail in Table 3 (page 3).

To assist elevator manufacturers/installers in acquiring the required seismic parameters in conformance with IBC and the 2013 elevator code, a Seismic Requirements Data Form is available on the NEII web site. Member companies can use this form to request the required seismic data from the building designer.

When does section 8.4 apply?

Legacy building codes allow force level calculations based on either seismic zone or ground motion Av. Where IBC has been adopted, force levels must be based on a number of seismic parameters (aka seismic design) as dictated in Section 8.4. For the elevator manufacturer/installer, the first concern is whether or not Section 8.4 applies to his/her particular project.
 
As listed in the first two sections of Table 3, Seismic Design Category and the Component Importance Factor, A17.1-2013/B44-13 requirements 8.4(a)(1) and 8.4(a)(2), respectively, are the key factors used to determine if the Elevator Seismic Requirements do or do not apply to the installation. (As a rule, A17.1/B44, Section 8.4, Elevator Seismic Requirements are considered applicable where either of the following exist

  • 8.4(a)( (1) Seismic Design Category C with Component Importance Factor, Ip, of 1.5 as defined by IBC (see 1.3, building code) 
  • 8.4(a)( (2) Seismic Design Category D or greater as defined by IBC (see 1.3, building code)

​A determination that seismic design is not required occurs where either of these conditions apply:

  • ​Buildings with Seismic Design Categories A or B,
  • ​Buildings with Seismic Design Category C where the Component Importance Factor is 1.0. 

A17.1-2013/B44-13 Incorporating IBC - How does section 8.4 apply?

If the Section 8.4 requirements do apply, the elevator manufacturer/installer is required to determine the Elevator Seismic Design Forces FP and FV and other parameters as given in Section 8.4.14. For the United States these forces and parameters are based on IBC with reference to ASCE 7. These seismic calculations and parameters are provided below in Table 4.

A17.1-2013/B44-13 Incorporating IBC - What section 8.4 requirements are impacted?

Elevator equipment installations under IBC have parameters differ from the traditional seismic zones approach. Some of the 8.4 requirements that are impacted where there is a difference in the determination and application of normal and seismic forces between the zone approach and the IBC approach are given below in Table 5.

A17.1-2013/B44-13 Incorporating IBC - What is the impact to rail bracket spacing?

​Under IBC, the permissible seismic force per pair of rails is determined from the horizontal force FP based on WP instead of directly from the Component Operating Weight WP. The guide rail bracket spacing will now decrease as a function of vertical location within the structure, i.e., the higher the bracket is located in the building, the closer the bracket spacing should be. This decrease in bracket spacing occurs due to the amplification factor [1 + 2(z/h)] that is applied to WP. (See Equation FP in Table 4.)  
 
As examples, bracket pairs installed at the building base will have an amplification factor of 1 applied to WP while bracket pairs installed at the roof level will have an amplification factor of 3 applied to WP. Intermediate bracket pairs will then fall somewhere between 1 and 3. To determine the required bracket spacing for various rail sizes, see Figures 8.4.8.2-1 through 8.4.8.2-7 in the 2013 elevator code.
 
The FP value as given in Table 4 is needed to determine the vertical bracket spacing for each bracket pair. The actual force value to be applied to Figure 8.4.2.2-1 through 8.4.8.2-7 vertical axis is 2.93 x 0.7 x FP. Further, these calculations include the amplification factor [1 + 2(z/h)] and as such will vary as a function of the vertical location of the guide-rail bracket relative to the building base. In order to perform these calculations, the person preparing the layout drawing must have the building base (b) and height (h) information.
 
This is critical data called for on the Seismic Requirement Data Form. From the base and height information, the person preparing the layout will determine the location of the bracket (z) relative to the base (b). It is at this point that the amplification factor can be known and the FP value for each rail pair determined. Given FP, the person preparing the layout can now determine rail bracket spacing. (See the appropriate Figure 8.4.8.2-1 through 8.4.8.2-7 in the 2013 elevator code).
 
Given parameters FP and FV, the F x-x and F y-y normal forces are also calculated and provided on the layout drawings. Without completing the above steps, one cannot prepare layout drawings that comply with IBC and the 2013 elevator code. Without this calculation, it is also not possible to determine the precise number of car and counterweight bracket pairs for the installation.

​A17.1-2013/B44-13 Incorporating IBC - Are there additional impacts to layout drawings?

​For jurisdictions enforcing IBC, the information required on elevator layouts relative to the normal forces Fx-x and Fy-y is determined by a different method (See Requirement 8.4.8.9.1). Here, these normal forces are calculated based on Horizontal Seismic Force FP and Vertical Seismic Force FV instead of Component Operating Weight WP. (See Equations FP and FV in Table 4). The calculations for these normal forces are given in Table 6.
 
As with rail bracket spacing consideration, these normal force calculations also include the amplification factor [1 + 2(z/h)]. In order to perform these calculations, the person preparing the layout drawing must have the building base (b) and height (h) information. This is critical data called for on the Seismic Requirement Data Form.
 
To date, more than 40 states in the United States have replaced their legacy building code with the IBC.

Eliminating counterweight derailment detection

Under IBC, the seismic zone approach no longer applies when determining whether or not a displacement switch (counterweight derailment) and the associated operation required by 8.4.10.1.1 may be eliminated. Instead, this determination is based on the calculation of seismic force FP. If all the conditions given in Table 7 are met, then the manufacturer installer may opt out of providing counterweight derailment detection.

​Alternatively, the option to not provide counterweight derailment detection can be made without having to calculate FP. This can be done using only the data given on the Seismic Requirement Data Form. The seismic parameters required to make this determination are Seismic Design Category (SDC) Component Importance Factor IP and Spectral Response Acceleration SDS. If all the conditions given in Table 8 are met, then the manufacturer installer may opt out of providing counterweight derailment detection.
 
It is also important to note that under IBC, there are a number of places in Section 8.4 where the determination of the seismic design forces first requires calculating Horizontal Strength Level FP and Concurrent Vertical Seismic Force FV using the equations given in Table 9. Having a means to determine zone equivalence may be useful in earlier bidding and evaluating requirements.
 
Table 10 gives a rough zone equivalence within the parameters of Seismic Design Category (SDC), Component Importance Factor IP and Spectral Response Acceleration for Short Period SDS.

​Conclusion

​As more and more buildings are being constructed under IBC, it is critical for elevator manufacturers/ installers to align themselves with the new IBC seismic requirements as applied in the A17.1-2013/B4413 elevator code. 

​About Nicole Van Velzen

​Author

​With over 17 years of communications and marketing experience, Nicole Van Velzen joined NEII as the Director of Communications in August 2017. In this role, Ms. Van Velzen serves as a partner with NEII’s public relations firm to advance our mission through media and other outreach, manages the monthly Insider newsletter, increases awareness through social media channels, and works closely with NEII’s Communications Committee.


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Elevator Safety and Accident Prevention

August 29, 2019

In light of a recent tragic and highly publicized accident in the U.S., the National Elevator Industry, Inc. (NEII) feels it is important to reaffirm the many measures our industry undertakes to provide a consistently high standard of safety.


Safety is the Elevator and Escalator Industry’s First Priority

NEII and its member companies are committed to the promotion of safe building transportation and continue to aggressively work toward improving and ensuring adoption of stringent safety codes, developing safer products and helping to educate the public on safe riding practices. While we cannot prevent every accident, we strongly believe that accidents such as these should never happen, and that it is our responsibility – from manufacturers, owners, managers and inspectors to the riding public – to uphold this overall commitment to safety.


Elevator Safety Codes Ensure Safe Equipment, Regular Maintenance and Inspections

The industry does have stringent codes in place to help ensure the safety of its products, and to make certain that machinery is maintained and inspected according to its respective codes. In addition, NEII fully supports licensing requirements for elevator and escalator mechanics across North America. 


Safety Features Keep Elevators From Moving While Doors are Open

Basic protections from elevators moving while their doors are open have in fact been in place since the 1920s. These simple electromechanical systems, which have continued to be improved over the years, are known as “interlocks” in later elevator codes, and exist on virtually all elevators in operation in the U.S. today. To better protect passengers from possible harm, the 1980 edition of the ASME A17.1 Safety Code for Elevators and Escalators implemented a provision that would lock the elevator car doors (door restrictors) when the car was more than 18 inches above or below the floor. This distance was recently changed to 7 inches. 


In 2000, the first harmonized edition of the ASME A17.1/CSA B44 code for new elevator installations was published it has incorporated the latest advances in technology, making additional protection possible and providing redundant protections against unintended elevator car movement. Elevators installed under the 2000 and later editions of the code contain these safety features:

  • A means to detect unintended car movement with the doors open  due to a failure in the drive machine, motor, brake, gearing, control system, hydraulic pressure, etc. that will immediately stop the car;
  • An independent, secondary emergency brake that is activated when unintended car movement is detected;
  • Application of this brake when a loss of power is detected; and
  • A requirement that the emergency brake be manually reset before the car is permitted to run again, requiring a qualified elevator mechanic to diagnose and correct the problem before the elevator is placed back in service.

For those elevators that predate the safety features introduced in the past 20 years, the ASME A17.3 Safety Code for Existing Elevators and Escalators contains basic requirements for rider safety in these older systems. These include requiring door restrictors and prohibiting the driving machine that moves the car from operating with passengers on the car if the elevator doors are not in a closed position. NEII has consistently advocated for the adoption of the ASME A17.3 within every jurisdiction nationally, to ensure that a designated minimum standard of safety is met, regardless of the age, model or manufacturer of the equipment.


Regular Inspections and Maintenance are Critical

As with any electrical and/or mechanical system, it is critical that elevators be inspected and maintained on a regular basis to ensure that these safety features are functional. The ASME A17.1/CSA B44 Safety Code for Elevators and Escalators prescribes regular maintenance and periodic testing and inspection for all elevators. Of course, their success relies on building owners that retain adequate elevator maintenance, elevator contractors and technicians that are proficient in their work, and jurisdictions that require qualified elevator inspectors to help ensure the safety of the equipment. Proper preventive maintenance plays a critical role in eliminating the potential for equipment malfunctions and addressing any prospective difficulties.


Unfortunately, accidents can still occur even with all of these measures and the protections contained in our safety codes. This is why the NEII member companies remain committed to developing new technology to further enhance passenger protection in both new and old elevators. NEII remains a strong advocate of elevator and escalator safety by continually improving the systems in place to help ensure rider safety, endorsing the adoption of current model codes by local government agencies, and assisting our national and international code-writing bodies in the improvement of rules that affect the installation, maintenance and operation of this equipment.

As elevator technology continues to evolve, these safety codes also encourage the efficient and safe adoption of the latest technical developments, resulting in elevator equipment that remains on the leading edge of safety, innovation and reliability.  


Elevators Are One of the Safest Forms of Transportation

Though elevators are one of the safest forms of transportation with over 18 billion passenger trips per year in the United States alone, following simple guidelines can help further improve passenger safety. We encourage everyone to review these guidelines regularly for more information on these topics. Please visit the elevator and escalator safety pages on the NEII website at www.neii.org.

About NEII

NEII is the premier trade association representing the global leaders in the building transportation industry. Its members install, maintain, and/or manufacture elevators, escalators, moving walks, and other building transportation products. NEII‘s membership includes the six major international companies – Fujitec America, Inc., KONE, Inc., Mitsubishi Electric US, Inc., Otis Elevator Company, Schindler Elevator Corporation, Thyssenkrupp Elevator Company and several other companies across the country. Collectively, the NEII members represent approximately eighty percent of the total hours worked within the elevator and escalator industry, employ more than 25,000 people in the U.S. and indirectly support hundreds of thousands of American jobs in affiliate industries. 

For more information about NEII, please visit www.neii.org

​About Nicole Van Velzen

​Author

​With over 17 years of communications and marketing experience, Nicole Van Velzen joined NEII as the Director of Communications in August 2017. In this role, Ms. Van Velzen serves as a partner with NEII’s public relations firm to advance our mission through media and other outreach, manages the monthly Insider newsletter, increases awareness through social media channels, and works closely with NEII’s Communications Committee.


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NEII Releases Elevator & Escalator Industry Cybersecurity Best Practices

CENTREVILLE, VA. (August 22, 2018)

The National Elevator Industry Inc. (NEII) the premier trade association for the building transportation industry in North America, has released the Elevator & Escalator Industry Cybersecurity Best Practices – a guideline for the industry developed by cybersecurity and codes experts from NEII member companies. 


The best practices were developed by experienced cybersecurity professionals from around the world, including North America, Europe, the Pacific Asia Lift and Escalator Association (PALEA) and the China Elevator Association (CEA). The Elevator and Escalator Industry Cybersecurity Best Practices has become a necessity as building transportation systems have become an integrated part of complex modern buildings with multiple controllers and processes, monitoring systems accessing the internet, and wi-fi capable communication systems.


While such connectivity takes elevators and escalators to new levels in availability, efficiency and general building safety, it also presents exposures to the world of cyber threats. These industry best practices will provide guidance until a comprehensive cybersecurity standard for elevators and escalators becomes available.


“Elevators and escalators have evolved to digitally connect to complex building systems, which requires a standard for safety and security of their computer systems," said Karen Penafiel, NEII Executive Director. "We are proud to have developed these best practices in cooperation with global cybersecurity experts, and we hope this guideline will influence elevator and escalator standards and code updates in the future."

About NEII

NEII is the premier trade association representing the global leaders in the building transportation industry. Its members install, maintain, and/or manufacture elevators, escalators, moving walks, and other building transportation products. NEII‘s membership includes the six major international companies – Fujitec America, Inc., KONE, Inc., Mitsubishi Electric US, Inc., Otis Elevator Company, Schindler Elevator Corporation, Thyssenkrupp Elevator Company and several other companies across the country. Collectively, the NEII members represent approximately eighty percent of the total hours worked within the elevator and escalator industry, employ more than 25,000 people in the U.S. and indirectly support hundreds of thousands of American jobs in affiliate industries. 

For more information about NEII, please visit www.neii.org

​About Nicole Van Velzen

​Author

​With over 17 years of communications and marketing experience, Nicole Van Velzen joined NEII as the Director of Communications in August 2017. In this role, Ms. Van Velzen serves as a partner with NEII’s public relations firm to advance our mission through media and other outreach, manages the monthly Insider newsletter, increases awareness through social media channels, and works closely with NEII’s Communications Committee.


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Global Technical Barrier-Free Trade Agreement

Recently, the agreement of the World Elevator Federation to maintain a Global Technical Barrier-Free Trade Agreement (GTBFT) was updated to include the signature of the National Lift Union of Russia. In this agreement, which NEII has signed as well, global leaders in the industry formally committed to a common line of actions to achieve Global Technical Barrier-Free Trade in the framework as defined by the World Trade Organization for the benefit of consumers, the industry and ensuring sustainable development.

 

The objective of the agreement is to promote and improve safety, facilitate technological innovation and the free movement of goods worldwide. Worldwide acceptance of the International Organization of Standardization (ISO) prescriptive standards is also a part of the agreement that will lead to a simple and efficient global approach for building transportation equipment that can be used by all manufacturers and installers.

 

Click here to view the signed agreement.

NEII Announces 2019 Board of Directors

CENTREVILLE, VA. (June 3, 2019)

The board of directors will lead the NEII mission as the organization continues to represent the global leaders in the building transportation industry through advocacy and code development. 

CENTREVILLE, VA. (June 3, 2019) - The National Elevator Industry, Inc. (NEII), the premier trade association representing the global leaders in the building transportation industry, announced the election of its new Board of Directors and officers at NEII's 85th annual meeting in West Palm Beach, Florida. The new leadership team will serve a one year term. The elected Board of Directors and officers include:

  • Tom Vining, President – A global industry leader with three decades serving Otis customers, employees and shareowners, Vining serves as president of Otis Americas, where he is responsible for the overall leadership and operating performance of Otis in North and South America.
  • Greg Ergenbright, Vice President – Ergenbright has been President of Schindler Elevator Corporation’s U.S. operations since 2013. He has more than 20 years working in the elevator industry.
  • Karen Penafiel, Secretary – Penafiel is the executive director of NEII and leads the staff team. She has over 28 years of building trade association management and advocacy experience.

NEII welcomes new Board member Gary Krupp, Fujitec America, Inc. – Krupp organizes and oversees the management of operations, engineering, manufacturing, sales and marketing and service across the United States and Canada as the president of Fujitec America, Inc. Mr. Krupp has over 25 years in the elevator industry and began his career with Fujitec in 2002.

Krupp joins the returning members of the NEII Board of Directors:

 

  • Larry Wash, KONE Americas — Wash serves as KONE Americas executive vice president and chief executive officer, a position he's held since 2012. Wash previously worked as president of Global Services for the Climate Solutions sector of Ingersoll Rand, vice president of service and contracting for Trane within North and Latin America, and in various leadership roles with Xerox and Eastman Kodak. Wash was the immediate past president of NEII. 
  • Sterrett Lloyd, Draka Elevator Products – Lloyd currently holds the position of president at Draka Elevator Products where he directs the company's worldwide operations. He began his lifetime of industry service as a contractor and is the third generation of his family to work in the industry.
  • Jon McCabe, thyssenkrupp Elevator Company – A well-respected leader within thyssenkrupp Elevator for more than 30 years, McCabe currently serves as executive vice president-field, a position he has held since 2017. McCabe previously served as vice president of new installation operations – US.
  • Erik Zommers, Mitsubishi Electric US, Inc. – Zommers is senior vice president/general manager of Mitsubishi Electric US, Inc.'s elevator and escalator division. He has been with Mitsubishi Electric since 1989 and is in charge of all US operations for the division.

The NEII Board of Directors sets the strategic direction of the association to drive its mission to advance safety and innovation in the building transportation industry throughout North America.

“In my second term as president of the NEII Board of Directors, I look forward to continue building on our association’s successes in the areas of safety, advocacy, and code development," said Tom Vining, president of NEII. "It is an honor to serve alongside this group of recognized leaders in the building transportation industry as we continue to promote safety, advocate for consistency in code adoption and enforcement, drive innovation and performance, and maintain equipment choice.” 

About NEII

NEII is the premier trade association representing the global leaders in the building transportation industry. Its members install, maintain, and/or manufacture elevators, escalators, moving walks, and other building transportation products. NEII‘s membership includes the six major international companies – Fujitec America, Inc., KONE, Inc., Mitsubishi Electric US, Inc., Otis Elevator Company, Schindler Elevator Corporation, Thyssenkrupp Elevator Company and several other companies across the country. Collectively, the NEII members represent approximately eighty percent of the total hours worked within the elevator and escalator industry, employ more than 25,000 people in the U.S. and indirectly support hundreds of thousands of American jobs in affiliate industries. 

For more information about NEII, please visit www.neii.org

​About Nicole Van Velzen

​Author

​With over 17 years of communications and marketing experience, Nicole Van Velzen joined NEII as the Director of Communications in August 2017. In this role, Ms. Van Velzen serves as a partner with NEII’s public relations firm to advance our mission through media and other outreach, manages the monthly Insider newsletter, increases awareness through social media channels, and works closely with NEII’s Communications Committee.


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NEII Rebrand

CENTREVILLE, VA. (May 1, 2019)

NATIONAL ELEVATOR INDUSTRY, INC. MARKS NEW ERA 

AS INDUSTRY LEADER WITH NEW VISUAL IDENTITY

NEII reveals new logo and website, and sets standards in motion

with renewed purpose for greater industry impact 

CENTREVILLE, VA (May 1, 2019) – The National Elevator Industry, Inc. (NEII) unveiled a new visual identity at their annual meeting last week, culminating years of organizational changes. Their new image reflects an expanded role as a leader of the building and vertical transportation industry and as a universally trusted resource for safety, codes and innovation in a fast evolving field.

“This rebrand and new website are significant milestones for our association. NEII has been undergoing a transition over the last few years, and the new look is a clear representation of a proactive and forward-thinking voice in the industry,” said NEII Executive Director Karen Penafiel. “In order to be the go-to resource for industry stakeholders, policymakers and others, NEII needed a contemporary platform to be consistent with our members as they innovate and adapt.”

NEII’s new logo introduces a modern design with shades of navy, yellow and white, and features two arrows, pointing in opposite directions, to represent elevator call buttons. The new website at neii.org provides easily-accessible information about NEII’s focus areas, including codes and standards, government affairs, safety, innovation and technology, and a variety of robust external resources. 

“Key stakeholders in the industry turn to NEII for technical information and data regarding safety, codes updates and guidance on new technologies,” said Kevin Brinkman, Vice President of Codes and Safety. “Our new identity and comprehensive website is much easier to navigate and provides a better understanding of the role we play in advancing safe and innovative products and technologies.”

 

This rebrand follows several major events for NEII in recent years, including:

  •  The hiring of Penafiel, a veteran of the buildings industry, as Executive Director.
  • Expanding the staff from one full time employee just 2.5 years ago to six full time employees today.
  • Partnering with other stakeholders to update the ASME A17.1/CSA B44 Safety Code for Elevators and Escalators as well as relevant NFPA and ICC building codes every three years.
  • Implementing a comprehensive government affairs program to influence elevator safety legislation and regulations across the country.
  • Launched Elevator and Escalator Industry Cybersecurity Best Practices to provide a guideline to aid elevator and escalator manufacturers in designing systems that protect and manage against network based cyber-attacks. 

Penafiel added, “This is truly an exciting time for NEII. Our fresh image and vibrant website provide important content to propel the industry in these rapidly changing times.”

About NEII

NEII is the premier trade association representing the global leaders in the building transportation industry. Its members install, maintain, and/or manufacture elevators, escalators, moving walks, and other building transportation products. NEII‘s membership includes the six major international companies – Fujitec America, Inc., KONE, Inc., Mitsubishi Electric US, Inc., Otis Elevator Company, Schindler Elevator Corporation, Thyssenkrupp Elevator Company and several other companies across the country. Collectively, the NEII members represent approximately eighty percent of the total hours worked within the elevator and escalator industry, employ more than 25,000 people in the U.S. and indirectly support hundreds of thousands of American jobs in affiliate industries. 

For more information about NEII, please visit www.neii.org


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The Rule of Three For Elevator Safety

NEII ILLUSTRATES THE RULE OF THREE FOR ELEVATOR SAFETY 

In the building transportation environment, codes and standards provide the necessary foundation for safety and innovation enabling modern cities to reach new heights.

CENTREVILLE, VA (May 13, 2019) – To celebrate Building Safety Month, the National Elevator Industry Inc. (NEII) published an infographic highlighting three key pillars of elevator and escalator safety. Mirroring the qualities of the strongest shape in nature, the triangle, NEII illustrates the impact and importance of code development, innovation and reliability for elevators and escalators. These three pillars work in tandem to create safe, efficient and resilient buildings and urban spaces. 

Each May, the International Code Council (ICC) hosts the annual Building Safety Month campaign to reinforce the necessity of adopting modern building codes and to educate individuals, families and businesses on the process for creating safe and sustainable structures. Learn more about this year’s campaign. 

NEII is the premier association for the elevator and escalator industry, providing advocacy, codes and safety expertise, and industry research.

Click to Download Infographic: Rule of Three for Elevator Safety

About NEII 

NEII is the premier trade association representing the global leaders in the building transportation industry. Its members install, maintain, and/or manufacture elevators, escalators, moving walks, and other building transportation products. NEII's membership includes the six major international companies - Fujitec America, Inc., KONE, Inc., Mitsubishi Electric US, Inc., Otis Elevator Company, Schindler Elevator Corporation, Thyssenkrupp Elevator Company and several other companies across the country. Collectively, the NEII members represent approximately eighty percent of the total hours worked within the elevator and escalator industry, employ more than 25,000 people in the U.S. and indirectly support hundreds of thousands of American jobs in affiliate industries. 

For more information about NEII, please visit www.neii.org. 


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Milestone Elevator Safety Legislation Becomes Law in Louisiana

CENTREVILLE, VA. (July 25, 2018)

The National Elevator Industry, Inc. (NEII) commends Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards and the bill’s sponsor Rep. Scott Simon for their leadership and support of the new milestone elevator mechanic licensing legislation recently signed into law. 

NEII, in partnership with the International Union of Elevator Constructors (IUEC), the Elevator Industry Work Preservation Fund (EIWPF) and other stakeholders, worked with the State of Louisiana to enact both licensing requirements for industry mechanics and to establish an elevator inspection program-neither of which previously existed statewide. The bill was passed by the legislature by a vote of 35-1. NEII‘s Director of Government Affairs, Dylan Isenberg, who testified in support of the bill, joined the Governor at the bill signing ceremony. 

The industry collaboration on this issue underscores the importance of standardized licensing requirements for mechanics and inspectors. Safety for both the riding public and industry personnel is best achieved when those working on elevator equipment are required to demonstrate a fundamental competency through a combination of classroom hours and on-the-job training. 

“Safety is the top priority for NEII and its members,” said NEII Executive Director Karen Penafiel. “In that pursuit, NEII supports licensing requirements which set minimum standards for the training, education and proficiency of elevator mechanics. Currently, 33 states have elevator mechanic licensing programs, and we will continue to work with other jurisdictions to implement and update comparable standards.” 

About NEII

NEII is the premier trade association representing the global leaders in the building transportation industry. Its members install, maintain, and/or manufacture elevators, escalators, moving walks, and other building transportation products. NEII‘s membership includes the six major international companies – Fujitec America, Inc., KONE, Inc., Mitsubishi Electric US, Inc., Otis Elevator Company, Schindler Elevator Corporation, Thyssenkrupp Elevator Company and several other companies across the country. Collectively, the NEII members represent approximately eighty percent of the total hours worked within the elevator and escalator industry, employ more than 25,000 people in the U.S. and indirectly support hundreds of thousands of American jobs in affiliate industries. 

For more information about NEII, please visit www.neii.org

​About Nicole Van Velzen

​Author

​With over 17 years of communications and marketing experience, Nicole Van Velzen joined NEII as the Director of Communications in August 2017. In this role, Ms. Van Velzen serves as a partner with NEII’s public relations firm to advance our mission through media and other outreach, manages the monthly Insider newsletter, increases awareness through social media channels, and works closely with NEII’s Communications Committee.


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NEII Announces New 2018 Board of Directors

Highlights

  • The newly elected board of directors will lead the NEII mission as the organization continues to represent the global leaders in the building transportation industry through advocacy and code development.

CENTREVILLE, VA. (May 16, 2018) – The National Elevator Industry, Inc. (NEII) the premier trade association representing the global leaders in the building transportation industry, announced the election of its new Board of Directors and officers at NEII‘s 84th annual meeting in Atlanta, GA. The new leadership team will serve a one year term. The elected Board of Directors and officers include: 

  • Tom Vining, President – Vining serves as president of Otis Americas, where he is responsible for the overall leadership and operating performance of Otis in North and South America. He has more than 25 years of industry experience.
  • Sterrett Lloyd, Vice President – Lloyd currently holds the position of president at Draka Elevator Products where he directs the company’s worldwide operations. He began his lifetime of industry service as a contractor and is the third generation of his family to work in the industry.
  • Michael Bauschka, Treasurer – Bauschka is the controller and treasurer for KONE Americas, where he leads the general accounting, treasury and tax functions for the region. He has more than 20 years of experience in this role.
  • Karen Penafiel, Secretary – Penafiel is the executive director of NEII and leads the staff team. She has over 28 years of building trade association management and advocacy experience.
  • Larry Wash, KONE Inc.– Wash serves as KONE Inc.’s executive vice president and chief executive officer, a position he’s held since 2012. Wash previously worked as president of Global Services for the Climate Solutions sector of Ingersoll Rand, vice president of service and contracting for Trane within North and Latin America, and in various leadership roles with Xerox and Eastman Kodak. Wash is the immediate past president of NEII.
  • Katsuji Okuda, Fujitec America, Inc. – Okuda is responsible for managing all aspects of Fujitec America operations, including engineering, manufacturing, sales, marketing and service in more than 14 cities. He has more than 30 years of experience with Fujitec North America.
  • Greg Ergenbright, Schindler Elevator Corporation – Ergenbright is CEO of Schindler Elevator Corporation’s US operations. He has more than 20 years working in the elevator industry.
  • Erik Zommers, Mitsubishi Electric US, Inc. – Zommers is senior vice president/general manager of Mitsubishi Electric US, Inc.’s elevator and escalator division. He has been with Mitsubishi Electric since 1989 and is in charge of all US operations for the division.
  • Jon McCabe, Thyssenkrupp Elevator Company– McCabe is a LEED Green Associate and serves as executive vice president-field for Thyssenkrupp, a position he has held since 2011.

The NEII Board of Directors sets the strategic direction of the association to drive its mission to advance safety and innovation in the building transportation industry throughout North America.

“I am honored to be elected president of the NEII Board of Directors, which is comprised of recognized leaders in the building transportation industry,” said Tom Vining, president of  NEII. “The momentum built by the leadership team has led the organization to grow and evolve extensively over the past two years. I look forward to building on NEII‘s successes in the advocacy of safety, innovation and code development.”

 

About NEII
NEII is the premier trade association representing the global leaders in the building transportation industry. Its members install, maintain, and/or manufacture elevators, escalators, moving walks, and other building transportation products. NEII‘s membership includes the six major international companies – Fujitec America, Inc., KONE, Inc., Mitsubishi Electric US, Inc., Otis Elevator Company, Schindler Elevator Corporation, Thyssenkrupp Elevator Company and several other companies across the country. Collectively, the NEII members represent approximately eighty percent of the total hours worked within the elevator and escalator industry, employ more than 25,000 people in the U.S. and indirectly support hundreds of thousands of American jobs in affiliate industries. 

For more information about NEII, please visit www.neii.org

Elevator/Escalator Industry Organizations Apply For New Technology Safety Accreditation

Not-for-profit Groups Seek Ability to Certify Elevator and Escalator Equipment for Safety
SALEM, N.Y. – (Jan 10, 2008) — The National Elevator Industry, Inc. (NEII) today announced that four organizations have applied to the American National Standards Institution (ANSI) for an esteemed industry accreditation. These four groups hope to become Accredited Elevator/Escalator Certification Organizations (AECOs), a distinction that recognizes credible, not-for-profit organizations and grants them the ability to certify elevator and escalator equipment for safety under the requirements of the newly-published Performance Based Safety Code (PBC) for Elevators and Escalators, ASME A17.7/CSA B44.7. The four applicants include:

  • Liftinstituut Holding BV, an international provider active in the field of technical safety;
  • TÜV Rheinland of North America, Inc., an international service group documenting the safety and quality of new and existing products, systems and services;
  • TÜV SÜD America Inc., a worldwide subsidiary of TÜV SÜD AG that focuses on industry, products and transportation; and
  • Underwriters Laboratories, Inc., a globally-known source for product compliance.

In addition to maintaining overall knowledge and experience with the ASME A17.1/CSA B44 Safety Code for Elevators and Escalators, ANSI requires that the individual AECOs be well-versed in the PBC, which provides an efficient, standardized method for establishing safety requirements for new elevator technologies. The PBC is considered an important complement to the 2007 version of the Safety Code for Elevators and Escalators – ASME A17.1/CSA B44 – which serves as the basis for the design, construction, installation, operation, testing, inspection, maintenance, alteration, and repair of elevators and escalators in the U.S. and Canada.

Process Requirements
In order to certify an innovative product, the PBC requires that applicable Global Essential Safety Requirements (GESRs) be selected from a list in this Code. A comprehensive Risk Assessment is then carried out by the applicant to ensure that the applicable GESRs have been met. The applicant is required to produce a Code Compliance Document (CCD) that includes the risk assessment; design and testing information; and various procedures necessary for the safe operation, inspection and maintenance of the elevator over its life cycle. The role of the AECO is to review the CCD and to verify that the PBC requirements have been met. The AECO reviews the applicable GESRs to ensure that the process has been appropriately executed, the risk identification and mitigation process is complete, safety parameters have been applied as needed, and residual risks have been addressed. Upon completion of the PBC compliance review, and after careful scrutiny of the CCD, the AECO would issue a Certificate of Conformance, confirming the equipment complies with the PBC. The AECO would then audit the process to verify that the certified equipment is being manufactured and installed to the requirements defined in the CCD.

To ensure a peak level of AECO competence, accreditation according to ISO/IEC Guide 65 is required. Accreditation is provided by ANSI or the Standards Council of Canada (SCC), the highest authorities in each country for national standards. Due to the superior standards set for the AECOs, this accreditation is held in high esteem by industry officials.

“AECOs are of vital importance to the industry as we continue to pursue adoption by local jurisdictions of the PBC as part of the latest Safety Code for Elevators and Escalators and for ensuring the safe and proper production of new equipment and technologies,” said Edward Donoghue, Managing Director of NEII. “Our mission has always been to encourage safe building transportation, and SCC’s and ANSI’s AECO program is an invaluable way to ensure proper processes are in effect for guaranteeing this safety.”

Applicants must meet several requirements to apply for AECO accreditation, including: proof of ownership of a certification mark and/or certificate of conformity, proof of the publicly available documents describing the applicant’s program, and a written description of the program, including a list of the standard(s) utilized and the identity of the inspection and laboratory body. Currently, the AECO applicants are still being reviewed and accreditation from ANSI may take up to another six months to complete the assessment process.

About NEII
The National Elevator Industry, Inc., is a national trade association representing the interests of corporations, firms or companies that, as part of their regular business, provide or perform any of the following: manufacture (including parts or components used by others in the manufacture, repair or maintenance), install, repair and maintain elevators, escalators, moving walks and related equipment. Trust membership is available to those corporations, firms, or companies who, as part of their regular business, employ members of the International Union of Elevator Constructors (IUEC) and contribute to the benefit trusts (Trusts) established by agreements between the IUEC and NEII. NEII strives to become the leader in promoting safe building transportation, as well as working with local government agencies to encourage the adoption and enforcement of the latest codes and standards. For more information about NEII or the PBC, log on to www.neii.org or www.pbc-elevators.com.

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